April 2017 Digital Edition

Click Here

March 2017 Digital Edition

Click Here

Feb. 2017 Digital Edition

Click Here

January 2017 Digital Edition

Click Here

Nov/Dec 2016 Digital Edition

Click Here

Oct 2016 Digital Edition

Click Here

Technology Sectors

Market Sectors

Wanted: Cognitive security systems that are predictive and forward looking

James Ionson
of JDC Inc.

Today’s “intelligent” security systems only confirm security breaches that have already taken place. They do not and cannot anticipate and prevent impending breaches before they occur, in real time. This sums up the most serious problem faced by today's security infrastructure.

Today’s security systems continue to rely on a human operator’s experience and instincts to process collected surveillance data and attempt to anticipate an impending security breach. Therefore, there is a critical need for a cognitive security system that simulates how we, as humans, instinctively predict, adapt and react to security breaches.

Cognitive security systems are based on sophisticated mathematical techniques that simulate the instinctive and emotional properties of a human brain, and are designed to anticipate impending security breaches in environments that are not well defined and are constantly changing. This forward-looking, predictive capability represents a fundamentally disruptive advance in security technology, which will dramatically reduce costs and collateral damage, and -- most important -- save lives.

Security systems claiming to be intelligent are really “knowledge-based” and very limited in their abilities. They are only marginally effective, in very rare cases where security environments and the aggressors’ threat profiles are identical to those upon which the systems’ knowledge is based. 

Typical security environments are highly dynamic and constantly changing, especially in venues that are crowded with people, vehicles and objects moving about and continuously being re-positioned. Even in relatively uncluttered environments, multiple intruders entering the environment can cause it to become dynamic, through techniques such as diversions and decoys, to name just two. And these techniques can easily confuse a non-intuitive, knowledge-based security system. If conditions exist that were not part of a knowledge-based system’s training data set, the system’s results would be questionable.  

The fallback position continues to rely on a human operator’s experience and instincts to process collected surveillance data and attempt to anticipate an impending security breach. Therefore, there is a critical need for a cognitive security system that simulates how we, as humans, instinctively predict, adapt and react to security breaches.

No pre-programmed rules

Cognitive security systems are not based upon preprogrammed “rules.” Instead, they are based on sophisticated mathematical techniques that simulate the instinctive properties of a human brain. The security environment within which such systems operate is subject to baseline adversary goals and threat profiles directed against adversary targets that often become more sophisticated as adversaries learn to take advantage of weaknesses within the security environment.  

 

Recent Videos

“Varian’s Imaging Components business has a 50 plus year history of dedication to the imaging industry.”—Sunny Sanyal, Senior Vice President and...
IntraLogic's official release of the "One Button" Lockdown system on CBS 2 News.
HID Global is opening the door to a new era of security and convenience.  Powered by Seos technology, the HID Mobile Access solution delivers a...
Mobile device forensics can make a difference in many investigations, but you need training that teaches you how to get the most out of your mobile...